"Paying more & getting less 2008" - Canada's Fraser Institute

Submitted by Dean Giustini on October 29, 2008 - 14:58

According to the 'right-leaning' Fraser Institute, "Provincial spending on health has grown faster than revenues in recent years...six out of 10 provinces are projected to spend more than 50 per cent of all available revenue on health care by 2036."


"Paying more & getting less 2008"
is the Fraser Institute’s fifth annual report on the financial
sustainability of health spending by provincial governments in Canada. The report uses a moving 10-year trend analysis to measure sustainability, and examines the long-term practicability of attempts by provincial governments to deal with the unsustainable growth in health spending through "increased taxation" and centrally-planned rationing. The analysis partially exposes the degree to which Canadians are paying more for government health insurance and getting
less in return.

...."Prince Edward Island will likely take 61 years to reach the 50 per cent point with Quebec taking 86 years before it is required to spend 50 per cent of its revenues on health care. Alberta is the only province where total revenues have grown at a rate comparable to health
care spending during the past 10 years."

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Isn't the above what you'd expect with an aging population?

Not really sure where to post this; no medical experiment blog that I know of:

Recently the NFLD government witnessed the simultaneous failure of a freezer and its backup housing stem cells for 26 cancer patients.  The stem cell had to be temporarily stored at -85C instead of the usual -150C with unknown effects on the efficacy of the stem cells.  This event probably happens intermittently throughout the world.

Wouldn't it be possible to test the effects of this on animals, warm stem cells and treat cancer afflicted animals?  Once again, a blog or wiki of potential medical experiment ideas might be useful even if this specific idea is not good for whatever reason.