Media release: Trends in HIV prevalence, new diagnoses, and mortality in Ontario

Submitted by Carlyn Zwarenstein on October 23, 2013 - 22:30

Open Medicine

A peer-reviewed, independent, open-access journal.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Trends in HIV prevalence, new HIV diagnoses, and mortality among adults with HIV who entered care in Ontario,1996/1997 to 2009/2010: a population-based study

Open Medicine <http://www.openmedicine.ca/> is pleased to publish the attached paper, which fills a gap in information about who gets diagnosed with HIV and who enters treatment for HIV in Ontario.

 
Until now, we have not had an informed picture of persons with HIV in Ontario who have accessed care. For the first time, researchers used Ontario’s administrative healthcare databases  to provide information on the demographics and outcomes of people living with HIV in the province.

 

“It’s mostly a good news story for those people who have entered care,” says Dr. Tony Antoniou of his team’s findings. “The advances in the management of HIV have reduced mortality to the extent that people are living longer with HIV.  However, our study also shows that people living with HIV are increasingly burdened by other conditions, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.”

 

Along with revealing the changing, increasingly diverse face of people living with HIV in Ontario, the study also suggests that some people who have tested positive with the disease have not entered care, and are therefore not benefiting from advances that have been made in the management of HIV infection.  

 

As the paper describes in detail, this new picture of HIV prevalence in Ontario should allow for better tracking of long-term trends in people living with HIV, such as co-morbidity, entry into care, and retention in care. It will also help inform future service planning and provision for the increasingly diverse population of persons living with HIV. 


Tony Antoniou, PhD, is a Research Scholar in the Department of Family and Community Medicine and a Scientist in the Keenan Research Centre of

the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine and the

Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. Brandon Zagorski, MSc, is an Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. At the time of this study, he was also an Analyst with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario. Ahmed M. Bayoumi is a Scientist in the Keenan Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Centre for Research on Inner City Health, St. Michael’s Hospital, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine and the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. Mona R. Loutfy, MD, MPH, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, and a Scientist at the Women’s College Hospital Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario. Carol Strike, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, and an Affiliate Scientist in the Health Systems and Health Equity Research Group, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario. Janet Raboud, PhD, is an Affiliate Scientist at the Toronto General Research Institute and an Associate Professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. Richard H. Glazier, MD, MPH, is a Professor and Clinician Scientist in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto and St. Michael’s Hospital, a Senior Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, and a Scientist in the Keenan Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Centre for Research on Inner City Health, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario.


For more information, please contact:
Tony Antoniou

T: 416-867-7460 x 8344
E: tantoniou@smh.ca

 

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